Skin Care Archives | The Neiman Dermatology Building – Buffalo, NY Cosmetic Dermatology

30 July 2019
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Eczema Tips

30 July 2019, Comments Comments Off on Eczema Tips

As discussed in a previous post, eczema is an autoimmune skin condition that can be worsened by certain irritants. The key to managing eczema is to avoid those irritants and appropriately care for your skin. Some ways to do that include…

Caring for Eczema

  • MOISTURIZE, MOISTURIZE, MOISTURIZE!!!!!!!!! Use either a cream or lotion, depending on which is best for your skin specifically.
  • Moisturize immediately after showering and then as needed throughout the day. Try using Cetaphil or Cerave.
  • Take cooler, shorter showers. Will help prevent your skin from being stripped from too much moisture.
  • Wash with gentle soaps. Dove soap, Purpose bar soap or Basis bar soap are all great options.
  • Soak in bath oils. Soothes the skin and helps to alleviate itching.
  • Put a humidifier in the bedroom. Adds moisture to the air, thus providing the skin with more hydration.
  • Clean your clothes with products that are fragrance and dye free. Try Tide (free & gentle) detergent, Downy (free & gentle) fabric softener, and Bounce (free & gentle) dryer sheets.

 

Since eczema is a chronic skin condition it is also important to use medications prescribed as directed. With effective treatment, you can keep eczema under control.


11 July 2019
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Why Velashape Is the Perfect Treatment For Summer

11 July 2019, Comments Comments Off on Why Velashape Is the Perfect Treatment For Summer

Summer is a great time of year to sit back, relax, and enjoy the sun. For many women with cellulite however, it can be one of the more stressful. The reason being, with the warmer weather less clothing is typically worn, making it more difficult to hide problematic areas. There is some hope though with the Velashape III Body Contouring & Cellulite Reduction treatment.

This non-invasive treatment utilizes a combination of technologies to smooth and tighten the skin, reducing the appearance of cellulite. The most common areas treated include the thighs, buttocks, and abdomen. Most patients notice improvement after just their first treatment, with a total of four treatments being advised.

The nice thing about the treatment is that it is one of the few unaffected by sun exposure and there is little to no downtime. This means you can go to the beach the next day. Which makes it the ideal treatment for the season!

If you would like to find out if Velashape III Body Contouring & Cellulite Reduction is right for you, contact our office today.


27 June 2019
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Do Bandaged Cuts Heal Faster?

27 June 2019, Comments Comments Off on Do Bandaged Cuts Heal Faster?

You may have heard that letting a cut breathe can help it heal faster. This is however not the case, as leaving a cut uncovered creates a dry environment actually leading to a slower healing process.

Bandaged cut

Cuts or wounds of any kind, need moisture to heal, and covering them with a bandage provides great benefits. Let’s say, for instance, you grate your knuckles instead of the cheese while preparing dinner. By the time you get to the medicine cabinet the blood will have started to coagulate. The resulting scab helps shut out dirt, but it also can get in the way of cells responsible for repair work. A bandage prevents the wound from drying, helping cells move freely in and around the cut. As a bonus, the bandage also soaks up wound fluid which contains growth factors that stimulate the repair process. Of course, bacteria-like moisture too.

So now to prevent infection, hospitals use bandages made of plastic wrap-like material that’s less porous than familiar bandages. This is better able to keep bacteria out. You can achieve some of the same results by smearing an antibiotic ointment on a cut and topping it off with a drugstore bandage. Read the label to make sure you’re using an antibiotic, which kills only bacteria and not an antiseptic like hydrogen peroxide, which can kill healthy cells too.

Studies have shown patients whose cuts are bandaged, heal twice as fast as those left exposed. Although removing a bandage may not be the most pleasant experience, remember that wearing one will help your cut heal that much faster.


20 May 2019
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Summer Skin Care

20 May 2019, Comments Comments Off on Summer Skin Care

With the unofficial beginning of summer next week with the Memorial Day holiday, many people will be spending more time outside over the next few months. As we learned in an earlier post, even if it’s not sunny out, harmful UVA and UVB rays are still prevalent. Here are just a few important things to keep in mind to help protect your skin this upcoming summer:

When applying sunscreens, layering them does not give added SPF protection. The SPF you end up with is only the SPF of the highest sunscreen you applied.  For example, if you apply a sunscreen with an SPF of 30 then apply one with an SPF of 25, you will only have protection of the SPF of 30.

The American Academy of Dematology (AAD) does recommend applying two layers of sunscreen on all exposed areas though. The second layer should be applied about 30 minutes after the first, at least 30 minutes before sun exposure.

SPF protection is on a logarithmic scale. This means there is a bigger difference between SPF 25 and SPF 30 than there is with SPF 30 and SPF 45.

SPF’s below 15 are essentially worthless.

If you do contract sunburn take Advil or Motrin. They block inflammation and can actually lessen the burn.

Just remember these tips to keep your skin safe and healthy this summer!


17 May 2019
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How to Treat a Sunburn

17 May 2019, Comments Comments Off on How to Treat a Sunburn

Maybe you fell asleep on the beach, or forgot to pack sunscreen.  However it happened, sunburn can be painful and in severe cases, even dangerous.  If you do get burned:

• Take a cool shower or bath, or apply wet, cold washcloths.
• Avoid products that contain benzocaine, lidocaine, or petroleum (Vaseline).
• Cover blisters with dry bandages to prevent infection.
• Take over-the-counter pain relievers like ibuprofen, but do not give aspirin to children.

Call a doctor if you have a serious reaction:

• Feeling faint or dizzy
• Rapid pulse or rapid breathing
• Extreme thirst, no urine output, or sunken eye
• Pale, clammy, or cool skin
• Nausea, fever, chills, or rash
• Eyes hurt and are sensitive to light
• Severe, painful blisters

Of course, it’s best to protect yourself from getting burned in the first place.  Exposure to the sun’s ultraviolet (UV) rays can increase your risk of developing skin cancer.  The American Cancer Society recommends taking these steps:

• Wear clothing and a wide-brimmed hat to protect as much skin as possible.  Protect your eyes with sunglasses that block at least 99% of UV light.
• Use sunscreen with a sun protection factor (SPF) of at least 30: reapply at least every 2 hours, and after swimming or sweating.
• Avoid direct exposure to the sun, especially between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., when rays are strongest.
• Avoid tanning beds and sunlamps: both can cause serious long-term skin damage and contribute to skin cancer.

Source: American Cancer Society, Healthy Living


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